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Toronto Personal Injury Law Blog

Brain injuries: causes and effects

Ontario residents might not be aware of the pernicious nature of acquired brain injuries. When people suffer post-natal damage to the brain on account of a traumatic or non-traumatic event, they may be susceptible to memory loss, communicative disabilities and even paralysis.

The prevalence of acquired brain injuries is not just a national issue, but a local concern as well. Countrywide, the number of victims reaches approximately 50,000 annually, according to statistics. In Ontario alone, some 44 people per day suffer an acquired brain injury, many of them due to accidents involving automobiles or in the workplace.

Ontario property owner might be liable for your accident

If you have been injured in an accident that occurred on someone else's property, the property owner or another party responsible for maintaining the property might be liable for the damages you have suffered. The Occupier's Liability Act requires that all property be maintained in such a way that it is safe for anyone who enters the property as well as for those in close proximity to the property. This includes public as well as private property.

Suppose, for example, that you were on public property and fell because you slipped on a wet floor or an icy sidewalk. Depending on the exact circumstances, the wet floor or icy sidewalk might be considered a dangerous property condition, and the property owner or manager may have been negligent in not correcting the condition.

Teen dies in Highway 17 crash, driver charged

On Aug. 21, a three-vehicle accident on Highway 17 left one teen dead and two other people injured. Ontario Provincial Police say that the 11:30 p.m. crash occurred in Greater Sudbury on the southwest bypass between Fielding Road and Southview Drive.

Following a preliminary investigation, police determined that a pickup truck heading west collided with a pickup and a car, both of which were travelling east. The 39-year-old man who was driving the westbound pickup suffered non-life-threatening injuries, while the man driving the eastbound pickup suffered minor injuries; both were hospitalised. The 18-year-old male driver of the eastbound car, however, died on the scene.

Police looking for hit-and-run driver

Ontario Provincial Police say one person was injured in a hit-and-run accident on Aug. 18. The crash involved three vehicles that collided on County Road 17 in Wendover shortly before 3 p.m. The female driver who was hurt in the accident was reported to have suffered non-life-threatening injuries. She was the only occupant of her vehicle.

Police say the car accident took place when the driver of a blue Mazda 3 attempted to pass a Kia. After the Mazda hit the Kia, the Kia collided with a truck that was driving in the opposite lane of traffic. Following the collisions, the Mazda driver apparently fled the scene. The driver was reported to be traveling eastbound out of the Wendover area, and the vehicle was described as a two-door hatchback model.

Separate accidents on Hwy. 400 claim 2 lives in less than 1 day

Two fatal traffic accidents occurred on Ontario's Highway 400 within a few hours of each other, beginning around 11 p.m. on Aug. 6 when a motorcyclist died in a single-vehicle crash. Around 4 a.m. the following day, an 82-year-old Vaughan woman was struck and killed by an apparent hit-and-run driver.

Following the motorcycle accident, the southbound lanes of Highway 400 were closed for several hours in the vicinity of Highway 401. The hit-and-run pedestrian accident caused lane closures for about five hours. One constable stated that even the alternate routes were congested and that it would take some time for traffic to clear.

One province sees steady increase in inattentive driving crashes

British Columbia motorists might be alarmed to read about crash data coming in from Toronto revealing that the number of drivers cited as inattentive has grown by 50 percent since 2000. Of the more than 55,000 drivers involved in a car accident and marked as inattentive by police, the data gathered by the Global News from Toronto between 2000 and 2012 reveals, approximately a fifth of the crashes involved injuries, and 12 accidents were fatal.

According to a Toronto constable, inattention while driving can constitute a wide range of activities, including using a mobile device, eating and putting on makeup. At the beginning of 2010, a law making distracted driving a criminal offense was enacted, so driving while using a handheld device became illegal. Since then, more than 82,000 drivers in Toronto have been charged under the law.

Driver charged in crash that injured 10 near Stratford

An Ontario woman is scheduled for a Sept. 8 court appearance for charges stemming from a recent car accident in the rural southwestern part of the province that sent six children to hospital. A total of 10 people were injured in the July 20 crash, which happened at about 5 p.m. on Embro Road south of Stratford.

According to police, a car carrying two adults and one child crossed into the oncoming lane and struck a minivan with two adults and five children on board. All of the kids are under the age of 10.

Understanding no-fault insurance

Like many others, Ontario drivers may be confused by the term "no-fault insurance." It does not mean that a person who causes an accident pays no penalty. The term means that regardless of fault, the insured person will receive compensation no matter who caused the motor vehicle accident. However, the at-fault driver may face increased future premiums and a notation in his or her insurance record.

The main difference between no-fault insurance and other kinds of insurance is that the claimant deals with his or her own insurer. In most cases, an injured person would have to pursue the at-fault driver for compensation to pay for lost income, suffering and other benefits. With a no-fault insurance policy, an injured person will have instant access to compensation from his or her own insurance carrier.

Ontario man charged after fatal accident

Ontario Provincial Police laid charges against a 23-year-old man who was allegedly responsible for a July 12 accident that resulted in the death of one person and the hospitalization of two others. Investigators believe that alcohol was a contributing factor in the accidental death of one of the passengers in the vehicle.

The accident occurred on Concession Road 9 in Nation Township around 3 a.m. Police believe that the 23-year-old Alexandria man who was driving the car, which was reported stolen, was impaired at the time of the crash. One of the five passengers in the vehicle, a 24-year-old Casselman man, died at the scene. One man suffered life-threatening injuries, and reports indicated that he was still hospitalized in critical condition as of July 14. One passenger suffered undisclosed injuries that were not life threatening. He was treated and released from a hospital.

No More Trials for Brampton Parking Tickets > Toronto Star (Wheels.ca)

Mr. Eric Lai, of the Toronto Star Wheels section, has again brought attention to an important issue that will affect tens of thousands of people per year, yet this new AMPS system raises questions as to its fairness - see the article here.

The City of Brampton has put up a FAQ page regarding its AMPS Program.

The City of Brampton also indicates that similar AMPS programs have been instituted in Mississauga, Vaughan, Burlington and Oshawa.