Bougadis, Chang LLP Barristers
800-566-7924 Toll Free
647-557-1757 Local

Toronto Personal Injury Law Blog

Fatal Ontario bus accident leaves 1 dead, 3 injured

A 56-year-old woman died and three other individual were injured in an Ontario bus accident on Jan. 14. The rollover accident happened around 10 p.m. on Highway 407. The woman was ejected from the bus and died at the scene, and one witness broke windows to help the driver and other individuals out of the bus. The driver and two other passengers were transferred to the hospital while two other passengers were uninjured.

The bus, which was headed toward York University, went over the guardrail near Weston Road. The cause of the crash remains under investigation. A representative from GO Transit would not comment as to whether the driver, who had 15 years of experience, had any medical conditions. There were also no known mechanical issues with the bus, and the accident remains under investigation. There was no video camera on the bus, but investigators are reviewing the on-board diagnostic computer. They are also continuing to interview witnesses.

Statutory Accident Benefits Coverages and car accidents

In Ontario, all insurance policies carry what is termed Statutory Accident Benefits Coverages, which mandates the provision of certain categories of benefits in the event someone is injured in an automobile accident. Under the law, people who are injured or the families of those killed may be compensated for certain types of losses.

By filing a claim with the at-fault driver's policy, injured people may receive money to replace lost income. If a person does not have wages from work and is not a caregiver, he or she may still be able to receive compensation if he or she is no longer able to carry on normally. Caregiver compensation is available to people who provide care services for others in order to compensate for expenses.

Toronto bus hits streetcar, 4 injured as a result

Two public transportation vehicles in the capital of Ontario collided on Dec. 27, authorities reported. Four people were injured in the accident, which reportedly occurred just after 10 a.m. at the Toronto intersection of Danforth Avenue and Main Street.

According to authorities, a bus that had just departed from Toronto Transit Commission's central depot attempted to turn left onto eastbound Danforth Avenue when it collided with a TTC streetcar that was traveling north on Main Street. The force of the impact derailed the streetcar and damaged both vehicles, reportedly.

4 hurt in Ontario bus collision

According to police, a Dec. 27 accident involving two Toronto Transit Commission vehicles, a bus and a streetcar, left four individuals injured. The investigation into the cause of the collision is reportedly ongoing.

The two-vehicle accident transpired at about 10:15 a.m. That is when the southbound bus purportedly struck the northbound streetcar at the intersection of Danforth Avenue and Main Street. Officials said the bus was attempting to make a left turn at the time of the crash. Emergency personnel took four individuals to hospitals, where they were treated for minor injuries. One of the injured individuals had been extracted from an involved vehicle on a backboard, apparently.

Ontario man turns himself in, faces charges in fatal accident

Officials indicated that a 39-year-old truck driver responsible for a fatal accident in June turned himself into police on Dec. 17. He is now facing multiple charges, including dangerous driving causing death.

The accident reportedly occurred when the 39-year-old man was driving a transport truck on westbound Highway 401 and hit another westbound vehicle, a Toyota Corolla, near the Thickson Road exit. Two passengers were in the Toyota, one of whom, a 29-year-old man, was killed on account of the highway crash.

The parties who pay for accident victims' health services

Drivers, passengers and other road users who are injured in Ontario vehicle accidents are entitled to paid non-professional health care services by automobile insurers under the Statutory Accident Benefit Schedule of the Insurance Act. However, the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care might cover other expenses.

Some of the health care services that automobile insurers may pay for are community support such as caregivers, social or recreational services, transportation and meals, and home repair and maintenance. They might also pay for attendant care, homemaking and personal support services such as house cleaning, preparing meals, laundry and personal hygiene assistance. Auto insurers generally arrange these services through long-term care facilities, Community Care Access Centres or other agencies that receive funding through the ministry, and they directly pay the service providers.

Medical, rehabilitation benefits for Ontario accident victims

People who are victims of car accidents may be entitled to medical and rehabilitation benefits under the Insurance Act, otherwise known as the Statutory Accident Benefits Schedule, if they were insured at the time of the crashes. These minimum benefits are stipulated in the Act for victims who become impaired.

The Act provides that all the necessary and reasonable medical expenses that the injured incurred, be reimbursed or paid for. This includes ambulance, hospital, surgical, nursing, optometric and dental services. Other medical benefits that are typically included are medications, mobility devices, hearing aids, occupational therapy and chiropractic services. Other medical services that the victims required as a result of their injuries may be covered also.

Head-on collision leaves 1 man dead in 3-car crash

Ontario drivers may be interested in the story of a three-car accident that occurred in York Region. An out-of-control SUV driven by a man traveling southbound on Highway 48 reportedly caused a head-on collision that resulted in one driver's death.

On the afternoon of Dec. 9 around 3:30 p.m., a pickup truck with a snowplow affixed to the front was traveling north on Highway 48. As it drove past Ravenshoe Road in Georgina, an SUV traveling in the opposite direction struck the side of the pickup's snowplow. A spokesperson from the Ontario Provincial Police says that the SUV then lost control and ended up in the northbound lane. The SUV, driven by a man from Quebec, collided with an oncoming minivan, killing the minivan's driver.

Traumatic brain injuries after a car accident

Each year in Ontario, many people suffer from traumatic brain injuries in car accidents, diving accidents, falls and sports. When you or a loved one have suffered a traumatic brain injury, you may be facing a lifetime of devastating personal injuries.

You may have experienced a permanent change in your personality, a loss of senses including touch, taste, sight or smell or cognitive impairments. Some people with brain injuries have difficulty with speaking and other forms of communication as well. You or your loved one may have memory problems, an inability to control your emotions, fine motor skill impairments and difficulty with reading or writing.

Icy conditions increase risk of slip-and-fall accidents

Slip-and-fall accidents can result in serious injuries, and Ontario residents are at a much greater risk for being involved in these kinds of accidents during icy weather conditions. When walking on wet sidewalks or driveways on particularly cold days, it is a good idea to take each step with caution in case there is any ice on the ground.

Injuries sustained after an icy slip-and-fall accident can range from a minor muscle strain to permanent spinal cord damage. After suffering from a muscle strain or sprain, individuals can normally recover from their injuries with rest, anti-inflammatory medication, and heat and ice packs. Unless they are particularly severe, tailbone injuries and compression fractures can usually be treated in the same way.